Reentry

Overview

Nationwide, more than 600,000 individuals are released from state or federal prison each year. Within three years, two-thirds will be rearrested, and nearly half returned to prison for a new crime or parole violation. In response, criminal justice officials are focusing on reentry as an issue that affects public safety, economic revitalization, and the well being of families and neighborhoods. Reentry courts, like the Harlem Parole Reentry Court, use community-based services like drug treatment and job training as well as strict judicial supervision, to help ex-offenders successfully transition back to life at home. To read more, visit Rethinking Reentry, a regularly-updated blog about how this project is working to reduce recidivism and enhance public safety in Upper Manhattan.

To get help planning, implementing, or evaluating a reentry program, click here.

Publications

Reentry Court Tool Kit

Reentry Court Tool Kit

By Christopher Watler and Debbie Boar

The Reentry Court Tool Kit is designed to provide guidance to justice planners in developing or enhancing a reentry court through the use of evidence-based and research-informed practices. The tool kit is organized around topics, such as "Screening and Assessment" and "Engaging Family Members," that planners and practitioners often confront in their work.

Articles

Department of Justice Supports Brooklyn Anti-Violence Project

Department of Justice Supports Brooklyn Anti-Violence Project

The Brownsville Anti-Violence Project receives support from the U.S. Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Assistance.

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Articles

Harlem Reentry Court – One Parolee’s Experience

Harlem Reentry Court – One Parolee’s Experience

A number of challenges exist for a parolee just leaving prison, and the newfound freedom of a parolee can be overwhelming. The Harlem Community Justice Center helps parolees make the transition from life in prison to responsible citizenship.

About a week before Debra left prison, she learned that she would be part of a new reentry program involving frequent court appearances and participation in a drug treatment program, among other activities. Debra had never heard of parole reentry before. “At first I was really mad,” she says. “I had never done parole in my life, but I knew you weren’t supposed to go to court or in front of a judge. I was really angry that I had to go every week.”

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Publications

Reentry Courts: Looking Ahead: A Conversation about Strategies for Offender Reintegration

Reentry Courts: Looking Ahead: A Conversation about Strategies for Offender Reintegration

By Robert V. Wolf

This report summarizes a discussion of reentry courts among policymakers, court practitioners, and parole and probation administrators. The conversation, which was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance in June 2010, focuses on reentry courts’ achievements, challenges, and future prospects.

Demonstration Projects
Most Popular Research

Video

Why Procedural Justice Matters: Tom R. Tyler at Community Justice 2012

Why Procedural Justice Matters: Tom R. Tyler at Community Justice 2012

Tom R. Tyler, professor of law and psychology at Yale Law School, presents on "Procedural Justice: Why It Matters So Much" at Community Justice 2012: the International Conference of Community Courts.

Publications

Do Reentry Courts Reduce Recidivism?

Do Reentry Courts Reduce Recidivism?

By Zachary Hamilton

This report documents the results of the first-ever rigorous test of a specialized reentry court. Among the findings, reentry court parolees (including both graduates and failures) were less likely to be rearrested or reconvicted than a comparison group of parolees.

Publications

Working Together: How a Neighborhood Justice Center in Harlem is Building Bridges and Improving Safety

Working Together: How a Neighborhood Justice Center in Harlem is Building Bridges and Improving Safety

By Carolyn Turgeon

A description of the Harlem Community Justice Center, a unique multi-jurisdictional community court that hears a mix of family and housing court cases.

Contact
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