Research

Overview

Research, evaluation, and dissemination play an essential role in the Center for Court Innovation's brand of justice reform. The Center uses a variety of research methodologies to evaluate whether new initiatives are successful or not, to identify areas for improvement and to document lessons for innovators around the world. The Center's research department contains more than a dozen social scientists who perform quantitative and qualitative studies. The Center shares its findings in a variety of formats, from academic publications geared to a research audience to how-to manuals for busy frontline justice system professionals to op-eds intended for the general public. While the means of dissemination may vary, the underlying goal is always the same: to use information to improve the fairness and effectiveness of the justice system. Click here to see results from the Center's demonstration projects.

Below are additional topics of research not covered in the main search list below:

Evaluation 101 | Neighborhood Surveys

Publications

The Criminal Justice Response to 16- and 17-Year-Old Defendants in New York

The Criminal Justice Response to 16- and 17-Year-Old Defendants in New York

By Warren A. Reich, Erin Farley, Michael Rempel and Suvi Hynynen Lambson

This report documents how the justice system currently handles 16- and 17-year-old defendants in New York State and presents an evaluation of the Adolescent Diversion Program, a pilot program that links these defendants to age-appropriate services in nine counties.

Read a fact sheet highlighting key findings and policy recommendations

Publications

A Community Court Grows in Brooklyn: A Comprehensive Evaluation of the Red Hook Community Justice Center (Full Report)

A Community Court Grows in Brooklyn: A Comprehensive Evaluation of the Red Hook Community Justice Center (Full Report)

By Cynthia G. Lee, Fred L. Cheesman II, David Rottman, Rachel Swaner, Suvi Hynynen Lambson, Michael Rempel and Richard Curtis

With funding from the National Institute of Justice, the National Center for State Courts completed this independent evaluation of the Red Hook Community Justice Center in 2013. The evaluation found that the Justice Center's emphasis on alternatives to incarceration, including community restitution projects and social services, helped reduce the use of jail even as it helped reduce recidivism among misdemeanor offenders.

Download executive summary

Download a fact sheet about the evaluation

Listen to an interview with the researchers

Download a fact sheet highlighting recommendations for improving court responses to misdemeanors

Publications

Innovation in the Criminal Justice System

Innovation in the Criminal Justice System

By Melissa Labriola, Emily Gold and Julia Kohn

The results from a survey of over 600 national criminal justice leaders provides a snapshot of the current state of innovation in criminal justice. It seeks to answer such questions as: Is innovation a priority? Are criminal justice leaders aware of emerging research? Do they use research to inform policymaking? What obstacles stand in the way of innovation?

Download a summary of the report

Presentation about the report with audio commentary

Publications

Testing the Cost Savings of Judicial Diversion

Testing the Cost Savings of Judicial Diversion

By Mark S. Waller, Shannon M. Carey, Erin Farley and Michael Rempel

Rockefeller Drug Law Reform, adopted in April 2009, eliminated mandatory prison sentences in New York State for most felony drug offenders and sought to link more felony-level drug and property offenders to treatment. This study looked at the impact of judicial diversion, finding that the new law increased court-ordered treatment participation; reduced incarceration and recidivism among those treated; and increased savings.

Listen to an interview with study co-author Shannon M. Carey

Read a summary of the study

Publications

From Absent to Present: Reducing Teen Chronic Absenteeism in New York City

From Absent to Present: Reducing Teen Chronic Absenteeism in New York City

By Members of the Youth Justice Board

This report, researched and written by the members of the 2012-13 Youth Justice Board, presents 10 recommendations with the goal of helping all teens attend school regularly.

Contact
  • New York
  • 520 8th Avenue
  • 18th Floor
  • New York, NY 10018
  • phone: 646.386.3100
  • Syracuse
  • One Park Place
  • 300 South State Street
  • Syracuse, NY 13202
  • phone: 315.266.4330
  • London
  • Kean House, 6 Kean Street
  • London, WC2B 4AS
  • phone: +44 2076.329.060