Problem-Solving Justice

Overview

Thousands of problem-solving courts are testing new approaches to difficult cases where social, human and legal problems intersect. In recent years, many in the field have sought to "go to scale" with problem-solving justice, testing key problem-solving principles outside of the specialized court context. The Bureau of Justice Assistance of the U.S. Department of Justice funded ten demonstration projects around the U.S. in support of this effort.

To get help planning, implementing, or evaluating a problem-solving initiative, click here.

Regional Summits

Courts, Community Engagement, and Innovative Practices in a Changing Landscape
Anaheim, California, December 4, 2015

The Center for Court Innovation, in partnership with the U.S. Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Assistance and the California Judicial Council, hosted a regional symposium with practitioners both inside and outside the justice system that covered a range of issues including best practices in procedural justice, risk and needs assessment, drug and mental health treatment, pretrial diversion, community engagement, as well as criminal justice challenges unique to California today. Read more about it here.

Reinvesting in Justice: What Comes Next?

Dallas, Texas, November 12, 2015

The Center for Court Innovation, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Assistance and the South Dallas Community Court, organized a summit that brought together practitioners both inside and outside the justice system to explore issues relating to chronic low-level offending. Read more about it here.

Roundtable

Statewide Coordination of Problem-Solving Courts

The Center for Court Innovation and the Bureau of Justice Assistance held a roundtable on statewide management of problem-solving courts. The roundtable featured judges, policymakers, and court administrators from a variety of states across the U.S.

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Publications

Principles of Problem-Solving Justice

Principles of Problem-Solving Justice

By Robert V. Wolf

An examination of the six principles that animate problem-solving justice based on an analysis of problem-solving projects from across the country, and feedback from leading practitioners.

Interviews

Douglas Van Dyk, Judge, Clackamas County Community Court

Douglas Van Dyk, Judge, Clackamas County Community Court

Judge Douglas Van Dyk is a Circuit Court Judge in Clackamas County, Oregon, and presides over the Overland Park Community Court, one of 10 sites to receive a grant from the U.S. Department of Justice under its Community-Based Problem-Solving Criminal Justice Initiative. Here he speaks about the court and how it works.

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Articles

Law School Courses in Problem-Solving Justice and Related Topics

Law School Courses in Problem-Solving Justice and Related Topics

As problem-solving innovation becomes more integrated into the way courts do business, law schools are beginning to offer courses examining problem-solving principles and practices. The Conference of Chief Justices and the Conference of State Court Administrators, among others, have urged law schools to include the principles and methods of problem-solving courts in their curricula. This article seeks to provide a short overview of current law school classes that touch on topics of problem-solving justice.

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Most Popular Research

Books

Good Courts: The Case for Problem-Solving Justice

Good Courts: The Case for Problem-Solving Justice

By Greg Berman and John Feinblatt

American criminal courts are in desperate need of reform. Public confidence in justice is at an all-time low. Victims, communities and even offenders see courts as unable to respond effectively to complex social and legal problems like drugs, domestic violence and quality-of-life crime. Even many judges and attorneys think that the courts produce assembly line justice.

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Publications

Prostitution Diversion Programs

Prostitution Diversion Programs

By Sarah Schweig, Danielle Malangone and Miriam Goodman

Many communities across the country grapple with how best to respond to prostitution.

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Video

Changing Lives: The Story of the Center for Court Innovation

Changing Lives: The Story of the Center for Court Innovation

This nine-minute video introduces viewers to the Center for Court Innovation. It includes remarks from U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, New York State Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, and Newark Mayor Cory Booker as well as interviews with Center staff, clients and community members.

Contact
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  • phone: +44 2076.329.060