Mental Health

Overview

Mental health courts link offenders who would ordinarily be prison-bound to long-term community-based treatment. They rely on thorough mental health assessments, individualized treatment plans and ongoing judicial monitoring to address both the mental health needs of offenders and public safety concerns of communities. New York's original mental health court is the Brooklyn Mental Health Court. Today there are hundreds of mental health courts across the country. And for adolescents charged with delinquency, the Center has created the Futures program, which brings key elements of mental health courts to delinquency court parts, providing mental health screening, assessment, intensive case management, and family support services.

To get help planning, implementing, or evaluating a mental health program, click here.

Publications

Criminal Justice Interventions for Offenders with Mental Illness: Evaluation of Mental Health Courts in Bronx and Brooklyn, New York

Criminal Justice Interventions for Offenders with Mental Illness: Evaluation of Mental Health Courts in Bronx and Brooklyn, New York

This Urban Institute evaluation of two mental health courts in New York City finds that mental health court participants are significantly less likely to recidivate, as compared to similar offenders with mental illness who experience business-as-usual court processing.

Audio

Brooklyn Mental Health Court: Linking Offenders to Treatment

Brooklyn Mental Health Court: Linking Offenders to Treatment

Judge Matthew D'Emic and others explain how the Brooklyn Mental Health Court links mentally-ill offenders to treatment and rigorously monitors compliance.

Interviews

Stephanie Rhoades, Judge, Anchorage Mental Health Court

Stephanie Rhoades, Judge, Anchorage Mental Health Court

Judge Stephanie Rhoades has presided over the Anchorage Mental Health Court—the first mental health court in Alaska—since it was created in 1998. 

Read More

Interviews

Bruce J. Winick, Professor, University of Miami School of Law and School of Medicine, and David B. Wexler, Professor, University of Arizona Law School

Bruce J. Winick, Professor, University of Miami School of Law and School of Medicine, and David B. Wexler, Professor, University of Arizona Law School

The late Bruce J. Winick and David B. Wexler talk about the relationship between therapeutic jurisprudence and problem-solving justice.

Read More

Demonstration Projects
Most Popular Research

Publications

What Makes A Court Problem-Solving: Universal Performance Indicators for Problem-Solving Justice

What Makes A Court Problem-Solving: Universal Performance Indicators for Problem-Solving Justice

By Adam Mansky, Rachel Porter and Michael Rempel

This report establishes a set of universal performance indicators against which to judge the success of specialized problem-solving courts.

Video

Why Procedural Justice Matters: Tom R. Tyler at Community Justice 2012

Why Procedural Justice Matters: Tom R. Tyler at Community Justice 2012

Tom R. Tyler, professor of law and psychology at Yale Law School, presents on "Procedural Justice: Why It Matters So Much" at Community Justice 2012: the International Conference of Community Courts.

Publications

Documenting Results: Research on Problem-Solving Justice

Documenting Results: Research on Problem-Solving Justice

By Staff of the Center for Court Innovation

This collection of research reports, written by Center for Court Innovation staff, analyzes the impact of a broad range of problem-solving initiatives launched in New York State and nationwide over the past decade.

Click here to order the book for $9.95 (including shipping and handling), from amazon.com.

Contact
  • New York
  • 520 8th Avenue
  • 18th Floor
  • New York, NY 10018
  • phone: 646.386.3100
  • Syracuse
  • One Park Place
  • 300 South State Street
  • Syracuse, NY 13202
  • phone: 315.266.4330
  • London
  • Kean House, 6 Kean Street
  • London, WC2B 4AS
  • phone: +44 2076.329.060