Gun Violence

The Center for Court Innovation seeks to reduce gun violence through a number of violence interruption and prevention projects. For example, in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, the Center has tested a public health approach to violence, adopting a model originally piloted in Chicago. In Brownsville, Brooklyn, the Center has started a program that brings together law enforcement and key community players to communicate a focused message to parolees that violence is unacceptable. The Center seeks to bring the lessons from these initiatives to other New York City neighborhoods, including the South Bronx.

Save Our Streets S.O.S.

Save Our Streets seeks to end shootings in Crown Heights. Trained outreach workers—hired for their street credibility, their knowledge of the neighborhood, and the positive changes they have made in their own lives—work evenings and nights to mediate street conflicts before they escalate into violence. The program also organizes marches and vigils whenever a shooting occurs in Brooklyn’s 77th precinct. For more information, see the S.O.S. blog. The youth organizing arm of S.O.S., (YO S.O.S.) aims to empower young people, ages 14-17, to become community leaders and organizers. Through a combination of experiential workshops and service learning opportunities, YO S.O.S. participants develop concrete leadership skills and real-world work experience. For more information, see the YO S.O.S. blog.

Publications

Testing a Public Health Approach to Gun Violence

Testing a Public Health Approach to Gun Violence

By Sarah Picard-Fritsche and Lenore Cerniglia

This report presents the results of a comprehensive impact and process evaluation of the anti-violence initiative Save Our Streets, which started in Crown Heights, Brooklyn in 2010. Results demonstrate that the initiative had a statistically significant impact on gun violence trends in Crown Heights when compared with three similar precincts in Brooklyn. 

Publications

Deterrence and Legitimacy in Brownsville, Brooklyn: A Process Evaluation of the Brownsville Anti-Violence Project

Deterrence and Legitimacy in Brownsville, Brooklyn: A Process Evaluation of the Brownsville Anti-Violence Project

By Sarah Picard-Fritsche, Rachel Swaner and Suvi Hynynen

This report documents a gun violence prevention program and finds high levels of cynicism regarding the fairness and effectiveness of the justice system among residents of the Brownsville neighborhood of Brooklyn.

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Articles

Department of Justice Supports Brooklyn Anti-Violence Project

Department of Justice Supports Brooklyn Anti-Violence Project

The Brownsville Anti-Violence Project receives support from the U.S. Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Assistance.

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Interviews

Connections Among People: Tracking and Preventing Violence through Social Network Analysis

Connections Among People: Tracking and Preventing Violence through Social Network Analysis

Sociologist Andrew Papachristos focuses his studies on urban neighborhoods, social networks, street gangs, violent crime, and gun violence. As a Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Scholar at Harvard University, Andrew will expand his use of network analysis to study crime in U.S. cities, paying particular attention to the way violence diffuses among populations of youth. During a break in a roundtable on collaborations between public health and public safety, he discusses how social network analysis can aid crime prevention.

 

Publications

From Chicago to Brooklyn: A Case Study in Program Replication

From Chicago to Brooklyn: A Case Study in Program Replication

By Greg Berman and Emily Gold

“From Chicago to Brooklyn” charts the course of a program’s efforts in Crown Heights, Brooklyn to replicate CeaseFire Chicago, an anti-gun violence model.

Most Popular Research

Publications

Community Perceptions of Brownsville: A Survey of Neighborhood Quality of Life, Safety, and Services

Community Perceptions of Brownsville: A Survey of Neighborhood Quality of Life, Safety, and Services

By Suvi Hynynen

The results of a community survey in Brownsville, Brooklyn. The survey, conducted in 2010, focuses on perceptions of neighborhood quality of life, youth issues, public safety, and criminal justice agencies.

Publications

Looking Forward: Youth Perspectives on Reducing Crime in Brownsville and Beyond

Looking Forward: Youth Perspectives on Reducing Crime in Brownsville and Beyond

By Members of the Youth Justice Board

This report presents the findings and recommendations of the Youth Justice Board. Since August 2010, the Youth Justice Board has focused on reducing youth crime in New York City using the neighborhood of Brownsville, Brooklyn as a case study.

Audio

Officials Announce Funding for the Brownsville Anti-Violence Project

Officials Announce Funding for the Brownsville Anti-Violence Project

A multi-faceted partnership to lower violence in one of Brooklyn’s most beleaguered neighborhoods gets a major boost with the announcement of $599,000 in funding from the U.S. Department of Justice. Among those speaking at a press conference to announce the grant are Denise E. O’Donnell, director of the U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, New York City Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York Loretta E. Lynch, and Brooklyn District Attorney Charles J. Hynes. September 2012

Contact
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