Research

Video

Denise O'Donnell: Community Justice 2014

Denise O'Donnell: Community Justice 2014

Denise O'Donnell, director of the Bureau of Justice Assistance, delivers opening remarks on the first day of Community Justice 2014, an international summit on how to reduce crime and incarceration while improving public trust in justice.

Publications

Healthy Communities May Make Safe Communities: Public Health Approaches to Violence Prevention

Healthy Communities May Make Safe Communities: Public Health Approaches to Violence Prevention

By Sarah Schweig

Publication in the NIJ Journal No. 273 about how police chiefs, public health directors, and researchers are establishing innovative public health/public safety collaborations to fight crime. 

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Video

Gavin Newsom: Community Justice 2014

Gavin Newsom: Community Justice 2014

In keynote remarks at Community Justice 2014, California Lt. Governor Gavin Newsom draws a parallel between community justice and internet innovations like Craig's List and Uber, praising them for their the bottom-up, customized approaches to doing business. 

Audio

Los Angeles City Attorney Says Listening is Key to Developing Effective Community-Based Programming

Los Angeles City Attorney Says Listening is Key to Developing Effective Community-Based Programming

In this New Thinking podcast, Los Angeles City Attorney Mike Feuer discusses his plans for community-based solutions to problems like truancy, gun violence, and prison overcrowding.

Publications

Predictors of Program Compliance and Re-arrest in the Brooklyn Mental Health Court

Predictors of Program Compliance and Re-arrest in the Brooklyn Mental Health Court

By Warren A. Reich, Sarah Picard-Fritsche, Lenore Cerniglia and Josy Hahn

An examination of factors associated with program compliance and recidivism in the Brooklyn Mental Health Court, this report documents that prior criminal history and having a co-occurring substance disorder predict noncompliance, mental health court failure, and re-arrest. Felony offenders were not found to differ in their re-arrest rates when compared to misdemeanor offenders. These results support the practice of accepting more serious offenders as participants in mental health courts.

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