Child Support Programs

Overview

Everyone wins when non-custodial parents find employment, pay their child support, and develop parenting skills. The Center’s Syracuse office, in collaboration with the Onondaga County Family Court, Syracuse University's Family Law & Social Policy Center, and a community-based program known as the Parent Success Initiative, piloted New York State’s first problem-solving child support program in 2008. Using this program as a model, the Center for Court Innovation worked with the New York City Human Resources Administration, the New York City Family Court, and FEGS to launch the Kings County Parent Support Program in 2010. Both programs link non-custodial parents with needed services to increase child support payments and maintain healthy parent-child relationships.

How It Works

The Parent Support Program is designed to help non-custodial parents meet their child support obligations and build stronger relationships with their children. The program links non-custodial parents who are involved in child support cases with a range of employment services and other assistance, including job skills development, vocational training, case management, family life skills classes, continuing education and literacy classes, legal advice and representation, transportation assistance, and child care.

Judges refer eligible non-custodial parents to the program when they appear in court for their child support cases. A resource coordinator screens each parent, assessing the client’s individual needs and linking him/her with appropriate services. The resource coordinator then monitors the client’s participation in the program, and provides the court with regular progress reports.

Results

During the first two years of the Parent Support Program in Syracuse:

  • 432 non-custodial parents were deemed eligible for the program.
  • 70% of eligible participants who accessed employment services were placed in positions of employment.
Featured Research

Publications

From Drug Court to Classroom: Creating a Court to College Program (Practitioners Manual)

From Drug Court to Classroom: Creating a Court to College Program (Practitioners Manual)

By Corey Calabrese, Valerie Raine and Gregg Roth

This Practitioners Manual provides step-by-step guidance for drug court teams looking to help participants pursue higher education. The other three manuals provide support for participants, interns, and trainers.

Publications

From Drug Court to Classroom: Creating a Court to College Program (Trainers Manual)

From Drug Court to Classroom: Creating a Court to College Program (Trainers Manual)

By Corey Calabrese, Valerie Raine and Gregg Roth

This guide for trainers is one of four manuals that, together, explain how drug court teams can create a program to help drug court participants pursue higher education. The Practitioners Manual provides a road map for the entire program, which gives step-by-step guidance to participants enrolling in and seeking financial aid for college. The other two manuals provide support for participants and interns.

Publications

From Drug Court to Classroom: Creating a Court to College Program (Participants Manual)

From Drug Court to Classroom: Creating a Court to College Program (Participants Manual)

By Corey Calabrese, Valerie Raine and Gregg Roth

This guide for participants is one of four manuals that, together, explain how drug court teams can create a program to help drug court participants pursue higher education. The Practitioners Manual provides a road map for the entire program, which gives step-by-step guidance to participants enrolling in and seeking financial aid for college. The other two manuals provide support for interns and trainers.

Contact
  • New York
  • 520 8th Avenue
  • 18th Floor
  • New York, NY 10018
  • phone: 646.386.3100
  • Syracuse
  • One Park Place
  • 300 South State Street
  • Syracuse, NY 13202
  • phone: 315.266.4330
  • London
  • Kean House, 6 Kean Street
  • London, WC2B 4AS
  • phone: +44 2076.329.060