Brownsville Community Justice Center

Overview

Currently in planning, the Brownsville Community Justice Center seeks to reengineer how the justice system works in Brownsville, Brooklyn.  In particular, the Justice Center is dedicated to building multiple off-ramps for young people who come into contact with the justice system. The Justice Center will provide much-needed educational, occupational, social, and health services at nearly every stage of the justice process, from arrest to prosecution to sentencing to aftercare following a stint in custody.  No matter how the Justice Center encounters a person—whether it’s a case diverted from prosecution or a mandate from a judge or an individual returning from incarceration upstate—the goals would be the same: to provide the kind of services and support that young people need to become law-abiding members of society. The ultimate goal is to reduce crime and the use of incarceration, while at the same restoring local faith in the justice system.

How It Works

The Brownsville Community Justice Center has already begun to implement programs to enhance the quality of life in the community.

Alternatives to Incarceration: Supported by an in-house clinic of social workers and case managers, the Justice Center provides judges in Kings County Criminal Court with a broad range of alternative sentencing options, including short-term social services, community restitution, psycho-educational groups sessions, and more intensive, longer-term clinical interventions for young offenders age 16-24 living or arrested in Brownsville. Clinic staff also receive referrals from the Department of Probation, Crossroads juvenile detention facility, the Office of Children and Family Services, and community-based organizations.

Probation: The New York City Department of Probation has a team of probation officers in Brownsville as part of the Neighborhood Opportunity Network (NeON) initiative. As part of this effort, the Brownsville Community Justice Center is working to connect men and women between the ages of 16 to 24 who have been in contact with the criminal justice system in the last 12 months to resources such as GED and college assistance, internships, and professional training. In addition, participants complete community benefit projects, including several large-scale mural projects and assisting with the construction of a community teaching garden.

Youth Court: The Brownsville Youth Court trains young people to hear actual cases involving their peers, such as assault, truancy, graffiti, and fare evasion. Instead of going through the traditional justice system, young people appear before the youth court where they are given sanctions meant to repair the harm their actions caused and are linked to local services to help them avoid further contact with the justice system. Each year, the youth court handles more than 100 cases and trains more than 60 young people. More than 90 percent of the participants complete their sanctions—community restitution, letters of apology, links to social services—as ordered.

Fighting Gun Crime: With support from the U.S. Department of Justice Bureau of Justice Assistance and the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services, the Brownsville Community Justice Center is working to combat gun and gang violence in Brownsville with the Brownsville Anti-Violence Project. Through a series of monthly “call-in” forums, the Anti-Violence Project brings together recently released parolees, law enforcement, justice agency representatives and key community players to send a message that violence is not acceptable. Additionally, the Anti-Violence Project, with the guidance of a youth and community advisory board, has launched a public education campaign that challenges destructive norms and behaviors that contribute to gun and gang violence in the community.

Learning Lab: The learning lab is an on-site computer room developed in partnership with the New York City Police Department to address a pressing need for educational support and workforce development amongst young people in Brownsville. The lab offers drop-in and scheduled programming to help participants improve their reading and writing abilities, critical thinking, and other skills.

Community Service: Supervised work crews are repairing conditions of disorder in Brownsville. Projects include park clean-ups, graffiti removal, and responses to other neighborhood eyesores that are reported by community residents—maintaining Pitkin Avenue, cleaning up Betsy Head Park, and working at community gardens.

Partners

The Brownsville Community Justice Center has been endorsed by New York State Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman, in addition to local partners such as the Brownsville Partnership, Community Partnership Commission Association, SCO Family Services, the Brownsville Recreation Center, and the Brooklyn Clergy Task Force. Support for planning and programming has come from a number of federal, state, and local agencies, including City of New York, the U.S. Department of Justice, the New York State Unified Court System and several private funders.

Featured Research

Audio

Officials Announce Funding for the Brownsville Anti-Violence Project

Officials Announce Funding for the Brownsville Anti-Violence Project

A multi-faceted partnership to lower violence in one of Brooklyn’s most beleaguered neighborhoods gets a major boost with the announcement of $599,000 in funding from the U.S. Department of Justice. Among those speaking at a press conference to announce the grant are Denise E. O’Donnell, director of the U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, New York City Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York Loretta E. Lynch, and Brooklyn District Attorney Charles J. Hynes. September 2012

Articles

Department of Justice Supports Brooklyn Anti-Violence Project

Department of Justice Supports Brooklyn Anti-Violence Project

The Brownsville Anti-Violence Project receives support from the U.S. Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Assistance.

Read More

Video

Talking It Through: A Teen-Police Dialogue

Talking It Through: A Teen-Police Dialogue

Relationships between police officers and young people are often challenging and unfriendly. One way to reduce tension and increase respect is to bring these two groups together in conversation to speak honestly and learn more about their different perspectives.

Read More

Brownsville Community Justice Center Blog
  • July 2, 2014
    Lighting up Pitkin Avenue with a Movie Night to kick off Summer

    On Friday, June 27 at 8:30pm, the Brownsville Community Justice Center, Pitkin Avenue Business Improvement District ("the BID"), and Rooftop Films...

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  • May 28, 2014
    Justice Center coordinates massive, multi-agency clean-up in Brownsville

    For as long as anyone can remember, the space behind the fence in the Langston Hughes parking lot has been a dump site. For well over a decade, a...

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  • May 20, 2014
    Brownsville at Dance Africa 2014: A Taste of Madagascar

    This past Saturday Brownsville Community Justice Center JOIN participants had the pleasure of visiting the Bedstuy Restoration Center for the...

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Contact
  • New York
  • 520 8th Avenue
  • 18th Floor
  • New York, NY 10018
  • phone: 646.386.3100
  • Syracuse
  • One Park Place
  • 300 South State Street
  • Syracuse, NY 13202
  • phone: 315.266.4330
  • London
  • Kean House, 6 Kean Street
  • London, WC2B 4AS
  • phone: +44 2076.329.060