New Directions

Overview

The context within which the Center for Court Innovation operates is constantly changing as new problems—and new ideas—emerge. Rather than shy away from this challenge, the Center actively seeks to explore new topics in justice reform. Sometimes this takes the form of a new programmatic wrinkle at a demonstration project. For example, the Center is currently testing new approaches to prostitution at several of its operating projects. In other cases, the Center explores new territory by convening experts in the field for facilitated discussions or performing new research or creating new publications. For example, in recent months the Center has helped to convene several roundtables devoted to exploring the intersection of public safety and public health. This section of the website highlights new directions and emerging areas of interest for the Center for Court Innovation.

Housing

From the mortgage crisis to landlord-tenant disputes, the Center for Court Innovation has sought solutions to complex problems involving housing.

Learn more

 

Violence Prevention and Public Health

Is violence contagious? How does living in a crime-addled neighborhood affect a person’s health? Does improving the health of a community improve community safety? In a new effort to explore these questions, the Center for Court Innovation has been collaborating with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) and The California Endowment to bring together police chiefs, public health experts, and grant-makers to discuss how law enforcement and public health might share resources and strategies to make communities safer.

Learn more

 

Retail Theft

Retail theft is often misunderstood to be a “victimless crime.” In reality, responding to retail theft is costly to public and private stakeholders, and few responses are evaluated for effectiveness or cost-efficiency. The Center for Court Innovation teamed up with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) and Target to create several promising approaches that provide an alternative to the traditional justice system.

Learn more

 

Publications

Seeding Change: How Small Projects Can Improve Community Health and Safety

Seeding Change: How Small Projects Can Improve Community Health and Safety

By Sarah Schweig

"Seeding Change" looks at how public health agencies and law enforcement can work together to improve communities. The report is the product of partnership between the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, The California Endowment, and the Center for Court Innovation.

Publications

Law Enforcement and Public Health: Sharing Resources and Strategies to Make Communities Safer

Law Enforcement and Public Health: Sharing Resources and Strategies to Make Communities Safer

By Robert V. Wolf

A look at how public health principles, practices, and resources can support law enforcement. This report is based on a moderated discussion sponsored by the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, The California Endowment, and the Center for Court Innovation. A version of this article appeared in the International Review of Law, Computers & Technology, Volume 26, Issue 1, 2012.

Most Popular Research

Publications

Prostitution Diversion Programs

Prostitution Diversion Programs

By Sarah Schweig, Danielle Malangone and Miriam Goodman

Many communities across the country grapple with how best to respond to prostitution.

Read More

Publications

Addressing Foreclosed and Abandoned Properties

Addressing Foreclosed and Abandoned Properties

By Roxann Pais and Robert V. Wolf

The strategies in this guide—which have been culled from real-life approaches across the U.S.—are intended to assist law enforcement and government agencies seeking to prevent property abandonment and lessen problems when abandonment occurs.

Publications

Evaluating the Mentors in Violence Prevention Program

Evaluating the Mentors in Violence Prevention Program

By Amanda Cissner

This combined process and impact evaluation supports the effectiveness of a gender violence prevention program adapted for college students, known as Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP).

Contact
  • New York
  • 520 8th Avenue
  • 18th Floor
  • New York, NY 10018
  • phone: 646.386.3100
  • Syracuse
  • One Park Place
  • 300 South State Street
  • Syracuse, NY 13202
  • phone: 315.266.4330
  • London
  • Kean House, 6 Kean Street
  • London, WC2B 4AS
  • phone: +44 2076.329.060