Research

Articles

Combating the Contagion of Violence: Learning from the Minority Youth Violence Prevention Program

Combating the Contagion of Violence: Learning from the Minority Youth Violence Prevention Program

By Matthew Watkins

The COPS Office's Patrice Howard and Lt. Roman Murrietta of the Sacramento Police Department discuss how the violence prevention initiative has enhanced community policing.The COPS Office's Patrice Howard and Lt. Roman Murrietta of the Sacramento Police Department discuss how the violence prevention initiative has enhanced community policing.

SAVANNAH, Ga., March 31, 2017 — Representatives from the nine sites participating in the federal Minority Youth Violence Prevention initiative gathered in Savannah, Georgia to share accomplishments, learn from common challenges, and plan for how best to carry the work forward.

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Articles

Learn more about the 2016-18 Youth Justice Board

Learn more about the 2016-18 Youth Justice Board

Description: To learn more how the Youth Justice Board works, the issue we’re studying this program cycle, and what our impact has been, please read this introduction. If you have any questions or want to support our work, don’t hesitate to reach out to us at yjb@courtinnovation.org.

Articles

A Regional Summit for Justice Practitioners

Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy delivers the keynote address at the Justice Innovation in Times of Change summit.Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy delivers the keynote address at the Justice Innovation in Times of Change summit.

The Center for Court Innovation, in partnership with the U.S. Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Assistance and the Quinnipiac University School of Law, hosted Justice Innovation in Times of Change: New Challenges, New Opportunities on September 30, 2016 at the Quinnipiac University School of Law, located at 370 Bassett Road in North Haven, CT. 

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Articles

Effective Court Communication: Assessing the  Need for Language Access Services for Limited  English Proficient Litigants in Domestic Violence,  Sexual Assault, Dating Violence, and Stalking Cases

Effective Court Communication: Assessing the Need for Language Access Services for Limited English Proficient Litigants in Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, Dating Violence, and Stalking Cases

Ensuring meaningful access to justice for Limited English Proficient (LEP) litigants is an essential responsibility of the justice system. To gauge the status of language access services for litigants in domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking cases, the Center for Court Innovation and the National Center for State Courts conducted a needs assessment of courts, government agencies, and community-based organizations in the fall of 2013. This report outlines the findings and makes recommendations for strengthening language access.

Articles

Kings County Parent Support Program Honors 10th Graduating Class

BROOKLYN, NY, Dec. 2, 2015 - The Kings County Parent Support Program celebrated its 10th graduation ceremony Wednesday at the Kings County Family Court in Downtown Brooklyn.  

As an audience of attorneys, court staff, family members, and representatives of community-based groups looked on, the 27 graduates, received certificates of recognition for completing the program.

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Articles

Courts, Community Engagement, and Innovative Practices in a Changing Landscape

Courts, Community Engagement, and Innovative Practices in a Changing Landscape

In Anaheim, New Approaches to Justice Reform

Regional justice symposium brings together California reformers

Tomiquia Moss, chief of staff to the Mayor of Oakland, discusses community engagement at the "Courts, Community Engagement, and Innovative Practices in a Changing Landscape" symposium in Anaheim.Tomiquia Moss, chief of staff to the Mayor of Oakland, discusses community engagement at the "Courts, Community Engagement, and Innovative Practices in a Changing Landscape" symposium in Anaheim.

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Articles

Reinvesting in Justice: What Comes Next?

Reinvesting in Justice: What Comes Next?

Justice practitioners gathered at the Dallas City Hall for a regional summit to explore criminal justice challenges and highlight innovative programs.

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Articles

Punitive court fines 'undermine respect for the law'

An article in The Guardian describes the Centre for Justice Innovation's critique of mandatory, punitive fines in English and Welsh criminal courts that the Centre says undermines respect for the law.

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Articles

Gentrifying Brownsville: Changes in Brooklyn ’hood Come from Within

Gentrifying Brownsville: Changes in Brooklyn ’hood Come from Within

Al Jazeera America reports on the evolution of Brownsville, Brooklyn, highlighting the Brownsville Community Justice Center's Belmont Revitalization Project

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Articles

Youth Justice Board Issues Report On Strengthening Police-Community Relations

NYC Teens Recommend Diverting More Young People From Justice System

NEW YORK, June 16, 2015 -- A group of teens unveiled recommendations for diverting young people from the justice system to an audience of policymakers and nonprofit leaders from across New York City.

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Articles

In Age Of Black Lives Matter, 3 Young Black Men Share Their Fears — And Hopes

In Age Of Black Lives Matter, 3 Young Black Men Share Their Fears — And Hopes

NPR profiles 3 young participants of the Brownsville Community Justice Center, who share their stories and talk about the issues facing Brownsville today. 

Watch the Video

Articles

Mental Health Screening Outcomes Among Justice-Involved Youths Under Community Supervision

Mental Health Screening Outcomes Among Justice-Involved Youths Under Community Supervision

By Warren A. Reich

In this study 812 youths arraigned on juvenile delinquency charges in New York City and placed under community supervision were screened for mental health disorders. Forty-eight percent of boys and 62% of girls flagged for possible mental health problems. The most frequently appearing flags, for mania and posttraumatic stress disorder, were comorbid with most other disorders. While youths who flagged on major depression, anxiety, or attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder were at higher risk for re-arrest, those who flagged for separation anxiety or suicidal ideation were actually less likely to be re-arrested. Published in the Journal of Offender Rehabilitation and available here.

Articles

Predictors of Mental Health Court Program Compliance and Rearrest in Brooklyn, New York

Predictors of Mental Health Court Program Compliance and Rearrest in Brooklyn, New York

By Warren A. Reich, Sarah Picard-Fritsche, Lenore Lebron and Josephine W. Hahn

In this article, mental health court graduation, in-program jail sanctions, and rearrest were tracked for 654 participants in the Brooklyn Mental Health Court. In general, risk factors for negative outcomes included a prior history of arrest or incarceration, having current property charges, current unemployment, homelessness at time of intake, and having a co-occurring substance use disorder. Published in the Journal of Offender Rehabilitation and available here

 

Articles

A Diagnostic Study of the Addiction Treatment Court in Guadalupe, Nuevo León, Mexico: Findings and Recommendations

A Diagnostic Study of the Addiction Treatment Court in Guadalupe, Nuevo León, Mexico: Findings and Recommendations

By Michael Rempel, Valerie Raine, Suvi Hynynen Lambson, Antonio Lomba Maurandi and Joseph Spadafore

With funding from the U.S. State Department, the Center for Court Innovation along with the Inter-American Commission for Drug-Abuse Control of the Organization of American States completed a diagnostic study of the Addiction Treatment Court in Guadalupe, Nuevo León, the first program of its kind in Mexico. (Spanish version is separately available here.) 

Articles

New York State’s Integrated Domestic Violence Court Model: Results from Four Recent Studies

New York State’s Integrated Domestic Violence Court Model: Results from Four Recent Studies

By Amanda Cissner, Sarah Picard-Fritsche and Michael Rempel

This article synthesizes findings from four recent studies examining the integrated domestic violence (IDV) court model. Based on a one family-one judge concept, the New York State court system has established more than 40 such courts across the state since 2001. These courts seek to achieve more informed judicial decision-making, fewer conflicting orders, improved service delivery to victims and their children, and a more efficient and comprehensible case processing system. Published in Domestic Violence Report.

To obtain this synthesis of four recent studies on integrated domestic violence courts, click here.

To obtain the full report on Suffolk County Integrated Domestic Violence Court:

To obtain the full report on the Erie County Integrated Domestic Violence Court:

To obtain the full report on interviews with litigants at the Yonkers Integrated Domestic Violence Court:

To obtain the full report examining results in nine other domestic violence courts:

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