Juvenile Justice

Publications

School-Based Youth Courts: Student Perceptions of School Climate, Safety, and Disciplinary Measures

School-Based Youth Courts: Student Perceptions of School Climate, Safety, and Disciplinary Measures

By Elise Jensen

Schools are increasingly using youth courts in place of detention and suspension, diverting students who commit school infractions from standard punishment. In this study of two New York City high school youth courts, youth court participants, teachers, and administrators expressed positive perceptions of the capacity of the youth court to serve as a meaningful alternative to the use of traditional discipline, although student surveys showed that the youth court did not have a quantifiable impact on school climate. The current study, though exploratory in nature, points to productive directions for future research.

Interviews

Hospital Seeks to Halt Violence Among Minority Youth

Hospital Seeks to Halt Violence Among Minority Youth

Our Lady of Lourdes Memorial Hospital in Binghamton, New York is working with community partners to develop a restorative, strength-based program that will divert high-risk youth from gang involvement as well as violent behavior. At the kick-off summit for the Minority Youth Violence Prevention initiative, Nancy Frank and Ralphalla Richardson discuss how they became interested in partnering with police to help stop the cycle of harm in some of Binghamton’s struggling neighborhoods.

Articles

Staten Island Youth Justice Center Annual Report 2014

Staten Island Youth Justice Center Annual Report 2014

Highlights of the Staten Island Youth Justice Center's accomplishments in 2014.

Publications

Moving the Mountains: A Conversation with New York State Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman

Moving the Mountains: A Conversation with New York State Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman

In January of 2015, New York State Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman visited the Center for Court Innovation for a one-on-one conversation with Greg Berman. Topics ranged from the challenges of implementing justice reforms, managing fiscal crises, the value of strongly worded dissents, and how Judge Lippman likes to relax. This is an edited transcript of that wide-ranging conversation.

Publications

Mental Health Screening Outcomes Among Justice-Involved Youths Under Community Supervision

Mental Health Screening Outcomes Among Justice-Involved Youths Under Community Supervision

By Warren A. Reich

Youth detained in juvenile correctional facilities are known to have an elevated rate of mental health symptoms, but far less is known about the mental health status of juveniles under community supervision. In this study, 812 youths participating in alternative to detention programs in New York City were screened for mental health disorders. Forty-eight percent of boys and 62% of girls were indicated for possible mental health problems. The most frequently appearing flags were for mania and posttraumatic stress disorder. Besides reporting prevalence rates for multiple disorders, the study also examines the relationship between mental health and re-arrest. Published in the Journal of Offender Rehabilitation 53: 3 (2014): 211-230. Click here for an abstract and how to order.

Publications

Building Healthy Teen Relationships: An Evaluation of the Fourth R Curriculum with Middle School Students in the Bronx

Building Healthy Teen Relationships: An Evaluation of the Fourth R Curriculum with Middle School Students in the Bronx

By Amanda Cissner and Lama Hassoun Ayoub

As the first U.S.-based evaluation of the The Fourth R: Strategies for Healthy Young Relationships, a dating violence prevention curriculum, this randomized controlled trial tests the effectiveness of the program with middle school students in the Bronx, New York. The curriculum, previously found to have limited impacts with Canadian ninth-graders, was found to have modest effects with the younger target audience. Notably, it was found to delay sexual activity for all participating students, and those students who received more of the program saw even greater delays in sexual activity, as well as reductions in bullying perpetration and attitudinal improvements. Results also suggest that high-risk students realized some reductions in dating violence.

 

Interviews

To Help Teens Experiencing Dating Violence, Meet Young People Where They're At

To Help Teens Experiencing Dating Violence, Meet Young People Where They're At

Some people mistakenly think that when teenagers experience intimate partner violence, it's less serious than when adults experience it, explains Andrew Sta. Ana,  supervising attorney of Day One, which seeks to end teen dating violence. "There's this idea, 'Oh, teen DV. That must mean domestic violence or intimate-partner violence 'lite'... I think that what's important to recognize about teen dating violence, particularly as it affects young women, is that [the age group of 18 to 24 has] the highest rates of dating violence" among any group, Sta. Ana says in this New Thinking podcast.

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Publications

Principles of Youth Justice Programming

Principles of Youth Justice Programming

The Center for Court Innovation’s youth justice programming includes arts programs, youth courts, and alternative-to-detention programs. These initiatives promote accountability, problem solving, and engagement. This fact sheet describes the Center’s youth programs and the seven key principles that guide them.

Publications

Fact Sheet: Improving Justice for 16- and 17-Year-Olds in New York: Policy Recommendations

Fact Sheet: Improving Justice for 16- and 17-Year-Olds in New York: Policy Recommendations

This fact sheet summarizes The Criminal Justice Response to 16- and 17-Year-Old defendants in New York and offers recommendations to policymakers considering raising the age of criminal responsibility.

Read the Full Report

Publications

The Criminal Justice Response to 16- and 17-Year-Old Defendants in New York

The Criminal Justice Response to 16- and 17-Year-Old Defendants in New York

By Warren A. Reich, Erin Farley, Michael Rempel and Suvi Hynynen Lambson

This report documents how the justice system currently handles 16- and 17-year-old defendants in New York State and presents an evaluation of the Adolescent Diversion Program, a pilot program that links these defendants to age-appropriate services in nine counties.

Read a fact sheet highlighting key findings and policy recommendations

Video

Family Voices in Juvenile Justice

Family Voices in Juvenile Justice

The juvenile justice system can be stressful and confusing for young people and their families. This 13-minute video supports families by answering some common questions: Who are the key people I may meet? Am I expected to appear in court with my child? What's going to happen to my child? What can I do as a family member to help?

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Interviews

Teenagers Learn about the Law as They Grapple with Cases of Bias & Bullying

Teenagers Learn about the Law as They Grapple with Cases of Bias & Bullying

The Stopping Hate and Delinquency by Empowering Students (SHADES) program is a teen court focusing on bullying and bias incidents. The program is run as a partnership of the Los Angeles Superior Court, Department of Probation, and the Museum of Tolerance. In this episode of New Thinking, David S. Wesley, presiding judge of the Los Angeles Superior Court, and Camilo Cruz, director of community relations for the Los Angeles Superior Court, discuss the growth of the city's teen court program and unique features of the SHADES program.

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Publications

Youth Court as an Option For Criminal Court Diversion

Youth Court as an Option For Criminal Court Diversion

By Nancy Fishman

Originally published in the New York State Bar Association Journal in January 2011, this article describes how New York youth courts work to divert cases from criminal court.

Publications

QUEST Futures: A Juvenile Mental Health Initiative

QUEST Futures: A Juvenile Mental Health Initiative

QUEST Futures is a juvenile mental health initiative that seeks to establish a comprehensive, coordinated response to youth with mental illness involved in the juvenile justice system in Queens, New York. This factsheet gives an overview of the program and highlights the findings of an impact evaluation of the program.

Interviews

Mental Health and Juvenile Justice: A Discussion about QUEST Futures

Mental Health and Juvenile Justice: A Discussion about QUEST Futures

QUEST Futures is a juvenile mental health initiative that seeks to establish a comprehensive, coordinated response to youth with mental illness involved in the juvenile justice system in Queens, New York. Here, researcher Josephine Hahn discusses the findings of an impact evaluation of the program. (February 2014)

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