Juvenile Justice

Video

The Short Answer: What are the Benefits of Giving Youth a Voice in their Probation Supervision and Service Plans?

The Short Answer: What are the Benefits of Giving Youth a Voice in their Probation Supervision and Service Plans?

Ana Bermudez, commissioner of the New York City Department of Probation, responds to the question: What are the benefits of giving youth a voice in their probation supervision and service plans? 

Publications

Bridging the Gap: Strengthening LGBTQ Youth and Police Relations

Bridging the Gap: Strengthening LGBTQ Youth and Police Relations

This report was written by the Queens Neighborhood Youth Justice Council composed of seven young people ages 14 to 19 who met twice a week for eight weeks at the Queens Youth Justice Center. The Council engages adolescents in Queens in public policy issues that affect young people. In the summer of 2015, the Council focused on community-level interactions between LGBTQ youth and police. Council members researched issues affecting LGBTQ youth and relationships and interactions between the youth and police officers.

Video

The Short Answer: In What Ways Can We Improve Outcomes for Youth Who Enter the Juvenile Justice System?

The Short Answer: In What Ways Can We Improve Outcomes for Youth Who Enter the Juvenile Justice System?

New York City Family Court Administrative Judge Jeanette Ruiz responds to the question: In what ways can we improve outcomes for youth who enter the juvenile justice system?

Publications

Advancing Community Justice: The Challenge of Brownsville, Brooklyn

Advancing Community Justice: The Challenge of Brownsville, Brooklyn

By Greg Berman

This monograph starts with a question: What can we do differently to enhance public safety, reduce the use of incarceration, and improve public perceptions of justice in a Brooklyn neighborhood that experiences both high crime and high rates of incarceration? The paper provides answers by looking at new reforms (including place-based interventions, procedural justice and new strategies for crime prevention) that have the potential to reduce offending, reengineer the relationship between the justice system and the public, and help activate a neighborhood’s capacity to help produce safety for itself.

Publications

Police-Youth Dialogues Toolkit

Police-Youth Dialogues Toolkit

The Center for Court Innovation and the United States Department of Justice COPS Office developed the Police-Youth Dialogues Toolkit as a resource for communities hoping to foster conversations between young people and the police, enabling them to discuss their interactions and find common ground. Drawing from projects across the country, the toolkit consolidates expertise, providing strategies and promising practices for police-youth dialogues.

 

Publications

Fact Sheet: Project Reset

Fact Sheet: Project Reset

This fact sheet provides an overview of Project Reset, an initiative that seeks to create meaningful diversion opportunities at the point of arrest for young adults in New York City.

Publications

Principles of Youth Justice Programs

Principles of Youth Justice Programs

The Center for Court Innovation works to improve outcomes for young people involved—or at risk of involvement—in the justice system. This fact sheet describes the Center’s youth justice programs, which seek to promote accountability, engage young people in skill-building, and spark civic engagement.

Publications

 The Adolescent Diversion Program: A First Year Evaluation of Alternatives to Conventional Case Processing for Defendants Ages 16 and 17 in New York

The Adolescent Diversion Program: A First Year Evaluation of Alternatives to Conventional Case Processing for Defendants Ages 16 and 17 in New York

This research report examines the first year of a new pilot program at nine sites in New York State. The impact analysis found that the program did not undermine public safety and was most effective for high-risk youth.

Articles

Mental Health Screening Outcomes Among Justice-Involved Youths Under Community Supervision

Mental Health Screening Outcomes Among Justice-Involved Youths Under Community Supervision

By Warren A. Reich

In this study 812 youths arraigned on juvenile delinquency charges in New York City and placed under community supervision were screened for mental health disorders. Forty-eight percent of boys and 62% of girls flagged for possible mental health problems. The most frequently appearing flags, for mania and posttraumatic stress disorder, were comorbid with most other disorders. While youths who flagged on major depression, anxiety, or attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder were at higher risk for re-arrest, those who flagged for separation anxiety or suicidal ideation were actually less likely to be re-arrested. Published in the Journal of Offender Rehabilitation and available here.

Articles

New York State’s Integrated Domestic Violence Court Model: Results from Four Recent Studies

New York State’s Integrated Domestic Violence Court Model: Results from Four Recent Studies

By Amanda Cissner, Sarah Picard-Fritsche and Michael Rempel

This article synthesizes findings from four recent studies examining the integrated domestic violence (IDV) court model. Based on a one family-one judge concept, the New York State court system has established more than 40 such courts across the state since 2001. These courts seek to achieve more informed judicial decision-making, fewer conflicting orders, improved service delivery to victims and their children, and a more efficient and comprehensible case processing system. Published in Domestic Violence Report.

To obtain this synthesis of four recent studies on integrated domestic violence courts, click here.

To obtain the full report on Suffolk County Integrated Domestic Violence Court:

To obtain the full report on the Erie County Integrated Domestic Violence Court:

To obtain the full report on interviews with litigants at the Yonkers Integrated Domestic Violence Court:

To obtain the full report examining results in nine other domestic violence courts:

Publications

Police-Community Relations

Police-Community Relations

This report summarizes lessons learned from the Center for Court Innovation's efforts to cultivate better communication and understanding between police, communities, and youth. (June 2015)

Publications

Stepping Up: Strengthening Police, Youth, and Community Relationships

Stepping Up: Strengthening Police, Youth, and Community Relationships

By Members of the Youth Justice Board

This report, researched and presented by the 2014-15 Youth Justice Board, focuses on how teenagers with prior arrests can benefit from meaningful interventions and avoid further justice system involvement. It also provides recommendations to strengthen police-youth relationships in New York City. 

Publications

Defending Childhood Demonstration Program

Defending Childhood Demonstration Program

In order to address the high prevalence of children’s exposure to violence, in 2010, eight sites around the country were selected by the U.S. Department of Justice for the Defending Childhood Demonstration Program. This national initiative aims: 1) to prevent children’s exposure to violence; 2) to mitigate the negative impact of such exposure when it does occur; and 3) to develop knowledge and spread awareness about children’s exposure to violence, both within and beyond the chosen pilot sites. The eight demonstration sites are:

Listen to an interview with the Researchers

Listen to an interview with the Cuyahoga County Defending Childhood Initiative team

Listen to an Interview with members of the Grand Forks County Defending Childhood Initiative team

Read More

Publications

Through the NOVA Door: A Process Evaluation of Shelby County’s Defending Childhood Initiative

Through the NOVA Door: A Process Evaluation of Shelby County’s Defending Childhood Initiative

By Elise Jensen and Rachel Swaner

The Shelby County Defending Childhood Initiative, known as the Network for Overcoming Violence and Abuse (NOVA), used a place-based approach to target children and families exposed to violence in three apartment complexes in the Frayser and Hickory Hill neighborhoods of Memphis. The initiative placed staff in apartment complexes to conduct outreach to children and families in need, and, through case management and advocacy, to refer families to necessary services for therapeutic treatment. Other project components included community awareness campaigns, professional training on topics such as children’s exposure to violence and data confidentiality, and the creation of a shared data management system. (April 2015)

Publications

Nawicakiciji – Woasniye – Oaye Waste: A Process Evaluation of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe’s Defending Childhood Initiative

Nawicakiciji – Woasniye – Oaye Waste: A Process Evaluation of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe’s Defending Childhood Initiative

By Rachel Swaner

The Rosebud Sioux Tribe Defending Childhood Initiative incorporated the Lakota way of life in all of its programming and approaches and viewed bringing back Lakota culture as a form of prevention work. The Rosebud DCI model focused heavily on providing case management services for children who have been exposed to violence. Staff facilitated traditional healing ceremonies and made referrals to culturally appropriate treatment, as well provided court- and school-based advocacy. Additionally, the initiative focused on bringing awareness about children’s exposure to violence and available resources to the different communities and schools on the reservation. Finally, staff worked to revise tribal legislation and policy to be more responsive to children’s exposure to violence. (April 2015)

Contact
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